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Chapter 10
NATURAL ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES
 
10.1 Objectives
   
  1. To protect and enhance the character of the Green Wedges as a key design feature of the town.
  2. To establish and maintain a defensible Metropolitan Green Belt boundary around Harlow.
  3. To protect and enhance the character of the town’s internal open spaces and the woodlands.
  4. To protect and enhance sites of nature conservation or landscape importance and to promote a greater awareness of nature conservation issues.
  5. To encourage biodiversity by conserving and enhancing existing wildlife habitats and to encourage new wildlife habitats.
  6. To preserve and enhance the natural qualities such as landscape character of sites identified for development.
  7. To provide opportunities for access to the District’s countryside and waterways.
 
10.2 Green Wedge
   
10.2.1 Green Wedges are fundamental to the character of Harlow. The Master Plan sought to preserve the form of the original landscape and the natural features that gave the area its particular character, and the green areas were generally kept free of buildings and as natural and as broad as possible to avoid bricks and mortar merging into one vast area. The design contrasted landscape and groups of buildings, and agricultural land was projected into the town to bring rural life in contact with urban life.
10.2.2 The Adopted 1995 Local Plan identified the extent of Green Wedges for the first time, with policies resisting any development, and designating new Wedges. The Green Wedge policy has been successful, and the wedges are largely intact. It has received strong support from the public, as shown by the opposition to large scale development proposals, Local Plan related consultations, and the general support of over 90% of the population for the protection of green spaces in the Mori Poll.
10.2.3 Most of the Green Wedges boundaries have been maintained with small scale detailed amendments. Two large areas of Green Wedge have been allocated at Newhall and east of Allende/Fifth Avenue, and the Green Wedge boundary south of Harlow College has been altered to allow for the Wet and Dry sport facility.
10.2.4 Monitoring has shown that there have been a modest number of planning applications made in the Green Wedges, mostly for small scale development which do not have an adverse effect on the roles of the Green Wedge. Planning permission has normally been granted for these types of applications. The majority were school or sports related, others were community uses, statutory undertakers and householder applications.
10.2.5 Although there have only been a few large scale development proposals, which have usually generated considerable opposition, most development proposals have not been progressed once the prospective applicant has been made aware of the policy at the pre-application stage. In exceptional circumstances planning permission has been granted for a few developments.
10.2.6 The Green Wedge fulfils a number of roles which have been set out in policy NE1. In identifying these roles consideration has been given to the policy background, consultation responses, types of uses and character of the Green Wedge.
10.2.7 Policy NE1 seeks to protect the Green Wedge from inappropriate development and to identify the roles of the Green Wedge.
 
 
NE1 Green Wedges will be protected from inappropriate development. Permission will not be granted, except for small scale development proposals and the replacement of existing buildings which do not have an adverse effect on the roles of the Green Wedges which are identified below:
  1. Providing a landscape design feature which is fundamental to the character of the town;
  2. Protecting and enhancing the inherent qualities of the landscape and keeping areas as natural as possible;
  3. Retaining the open character of existing uses and safeguarding the land from inappropriate development;
  4. Preserving sites of ecological value and maximising potential for biodiversity in Harlow;
  5. Separating neighbourhoods, housing areas and industrial areas;
  6. Preserving the setting and special character of a number of historic sites and areas;
  7. Contributing towards the amenities of local residents.
 
10.3 New Green Wedge
   
10.3.1 The principles of the Green Wedge were established in the 1952 Master Plan and have been embodied in the Local Plan. New Green Wedges will be identified on the Proposals Map which fulfil several of the roles identified in policy NE1. The new Green Wedges shall be identified according to the following policy.
 
 
NE2 The following new areas of Green Wedge have been identified on the Proposals Map:
 
Ref.No. Allocated Sport Centre
NE2/1
At Newhall, the New Pond Spring Natural Habitat site forms the basis of a north-south Green Wedge linking Church Langley to Old Harlow.
NE2/2
Church Langley Park, the multi-use provision of a community gym, extension to the existing tennis courts, a floodlit all weather playing surface, and a summer paddling pool/winter BMX and skateboard park.
 
10.4 Metropolitan Green Belt
   
10.4.1 Harlow is situated in the Green Belt. The Adopted Plan of 1995 and subsequent Alterations in 1998 defined for the first time the areas of Green Belt within the district’s boundary.
10.4.2 PPG2 states that the main aim of Green Belt policy is to prevent urban sprawl by keeping land permanently open. This is achieved by preventing new development unless it is for a defined ‘appropriate use’. The essential characteristic of the Green Belt is it’s permanence and protection must be maintained as far as can be seen ahead.
10.4.3 PPG2 lists 5 purposes of including land in the Green Belt:
  a) To check the unrestricted sprawl of built-up areas;
  b) To prevent neighbouring towns from merging into one another;
  c) To assist in safeguarding the countryside from further encroachment;
  d) To preserve the setting and special character of historic towns; and
  e) To assist in urban regeneration, by encouraging the recycling of derelict and other urban land.
10.4.4 PPG2 lists the objectives for the use of the Green Belt:
  a) To provide opportunities for access to the open countryside for the urban population;
  b) To provide opportunities for outdoor sport and outdoor recreation near urban areas;
  c) To retain attractive landscapes, and enhance landscapes, near to where people live;
  d) To improve damaged and derelict land around towns;
  e) To secure nature conservation interests; and
  f) To retain land in agriculture, forestry and related uses.
10.4.5 The Structure Plan Policy C4 requires Local Planning Authorities to undertake a review of inner Green Belt boundaries, including safeguarded land. It is therefore necessary to assess if there are any exceptional circumstances that would justify altering the Green Belt boundary within Harlow. The housing and employment land allocations from the Structure Plan can be accommodated within the district without a release of further Green Belt for development. Therefore, the Local Plan does not make any changes to the Green Belt boundary.
 
 
NE3 Within the Metropolitan Green Belt there is a general presumption against inappropriate development. Except in very special circumstances, planning permission will not be granted unless for:
  1. Development required for agriculture and forestry;
  2. Essential small scale facilities for outdoor sport and outdoor recreation, for cemeteries and for other uses of land which fulfil the objectives of the Green Belt;
  3. Limited extension, alteration and replacement of existing dwellings;
  4. The reuse of existing buildings in accordance with Policy NE9.
  Development permitted under this policy should preserve the openness of the Green Belt and should not conflict with any of the main purposes of including land within it.
  Development that is permitted must be of a scale, design and siting such that the character and appearance of the countryside is not harmed.
 
10.5 Extensions to Existing Dwellings within the Green Belt
   
10.5.1 Within the Green Belt the Council is concerned about the effects which extensions to houses can have on the appearance and character, both in itself and in relation to nearby buildings. The enlargement of existing dwellings also serves to reduce the supply of smaller dwellings suitable for the needs of first-time buyers.
 
 
NE4 Planning permission will not be granted for extensions to existing dwellings within the Green Belt unless they are:
  1. Visually subordinate to the original building;
  2. Designed to relate well to the existing building in terms of scale, size, design, siting and construction materials, following the design principles of the Essex Design Guide.
  Modest extensions to small dwellings which are intended to provide kitchen, bathroom or amenities to meet the expectations of current living standards will be considered sympathetically.
  The extension of the curtilage of a residential property onto adjoining agriculture or amenity land will not normally be permitted.
 
10.6 Special Restraint Areas
   
10.6.1 The Local Plan identifies Special Restraint Areas (SRA) where land is protected until it is needed to meet future development needs. The Structure Plan identified the SRA north of Church Langley (Newhall) to meet development needs. This area has been committed for housing in this Plan.
10.6.2 Development may be required for the next plan period and Government advice in PPG2 is that Council’s should provide some flexibility for future development. The land north of Gilden Way is therefore identified as SRA as safeguarded land between the urban area and the Green Belt to meet longer term development needs.
10.6.3

Following a re-assessment of factors including the Structure Plan, the Urban Capacity Study and Regional and Government Guidance. The results of the Urban Capacity Study, together with Local Plan allocations, indicate that the housing requirement could be met without building on the existing SRAs. Therefore it is not proposed to provide additional SRA on land to the east of Newhall as suggested in the Second Issues Report. It is considered that exceptional circumstances to justify changes to the Green Belt boundary to provide additional SRA do not exist at this stage. It is proposed to retain the existing SRA at Gilden Way. The major growth of Harlow suggested as a possibility in the Community Strategy could result in the subsequent development of the SRA.

 
 
NE5 The following Special Restraint Area has been identified on the Proposals Map:
 
Ref.No. Sites
NE5/1
Land north of Gilden Way
  There will be a presumption against development in the Special Restraint Area unless:
  1. The development meets the Green Belt policy test, and does not prejudice the development of the site for longer term needs;
  2. The land is shown to be needed for development resulting from a review of this Local Plan.
 
 
NE6 If a need is established to develop land identified as Special Restraint Area following a review of this Local Plan the following shall be taken into account:
  1. A Master Plan incorporating a detailed landscape survey shall be prepared for the Special Restraint Area;
  2. At land at Gilden Way substantial Green Wedges shall be designated between the proposed area of development and Old Harlow and Churchgate Street and careful account should be taken of other considerations on the site.
 
10.7 Internal Open Spaces
   
10.7.1 This is defined in the Local Plan as all open areas outside the curtilage of existing buildings and which are not Green Wedge, Metropolitan Green Belt or any other specified use. These open areas vary in nature from a small strip of landscaping next to the road/path to large areas of playing fields. They are mostly within housing areas.
 
 
NE7 Proposals for development on internal open spaces will only be permitted for:
  1. Leisure and recreation uses;
  2. Community uses, including facilities for clubs and societies.
  Planning applications will only be considered for these developments which do not compromise the landscape principles of the town.
 
10.8 Agricultural Land
   
10.8.1 PPG7 advises that the best and most versatile agricultural land (grades 1,2,3a) is a national resource for the future and therefore weight should be given to protecting it from development. There are relatively few areas of Harlow still in agricultural use.
 
10.9 Agricultural Housing
   
10.9.1 The need for additional agricultural dwellings in the MGB is very rare, and proposals will be considered on their merits and against the criteria laid in policy NE8.
 
 
NE8 Planning permission will be granted for new housing in the Metropolitan Green Belt for agricultural or forestry workers where the applicant can demonstrate all the following:
  1. That a genuine agricultural need exists;
  2. That no alternative accommodation can be suitably provided elsewhere;
  3. That there is a need for 24 hour per day worker attendance or supervision;
  4. That the need has not arisen due to severance or subdivision of a holding which has resulted in a new holding with no dwellings associated with it;
  5. That the site is satisfactory and well related to existing farm buildings or other dwellings;
  6. That the dwelling is of a size compatible with the established functional needs;
  7. That satisfactory access can be provided;
  8. The existing and future viability of an agricultural or forestry enterprise.
  Where planning permission is granted, a condition restricting occupancy to people employed in agriculture or forestry would be imposed.
 
10.10 Re-use of Rural Buildings
   
10.10.1 Changes in agricultural practice have resulted in some farm buildings becoming surplus to requirements. PPG7 encourages re-use of existing buildings to diversify the rural economy and provide new enterprise and jobs.
 
 
NE9 The re-use and adapting of rural buildings for residential use will be granted planning permission if it is demonstrated that:
  1. The building is worthy of retention because of its architectural, heritage or landscape value;
  2. There is no current or future potential for viable economic use of the building;
  3. Its conservation can be achieved without impact on the fabric and character of the building and without the need for unsympathetic changes to, or the introduction of features such as windows, door openings and chimneys;
  4. The building is located within or directly adjoining a group of other buildings;
  5. Associated domestic developments such as garages, stores, and play equipment are controlled.
 
10.11 Accessible Natural Greenspaces
   
10.11.1 Lack of access to Accessible Natural Greenspace is an indicator of deprivation, and there are standards produced by English Nature that seek to ensure that everyone should have access to Accessible Natural Greenspace near their home.
 
 
NE10 Proposals are encouraged which create accessible habitat(s) that contribute towards achieving the Accessible Natural Greenspace standards stated below:
  1. One Accessible Natural Greenspace within 300m of home;
  2. One 20 hectare Accessible Natural Greenspace within 2 kilometres of home;
  3. One 500 hectare Accessible Natural Greenspace within 10 kilometres of home.
 
10.12 Countryside Management
   
10.12.1 The management of the countryside aims to improve access and provision for informal outdoor recreation to conserve wildlife habitats and natural resources, especially in sensitive locations, and to increase public understanding and respect for the countryside. Countryside management initiatives that enhance biodiversity, improve access or provide for informal outdoor recreation within Harlow will be supported.
 
10.13 Trees and Hedgerows
   
10.13.1 Many parts of Harlow have hedgerows of historic and ecological importance especially along highways and those which define old parish and farm boundaries. The Hedgerow Regulations aim to protect important hedgerows. Proposals therefore on sites with existing hedgerow(s) will be expected to retain, and if necessary, reinforce and extend the hedgerow(s) by the planting of native broadleaf species. Developers will also be expected to agree and fund an appropriate hedgerow management scheme with the Council.
10.13.2 Trees and woodlands play an important role in the environment. For an urban area Harlow is well provided with significant trees and woodlands which contribute toward providing a varied and attractive environment in the town. Trees in Harlow can be protected by a Tree Preservation Order made by the Council or Essex County Council. Anyone proposing to cut down, top or lop a tree in a conservation area is required to give six weeks notice to the local planning authority to give the authority an opportunity to consider making a Tree Preservation Order. Only in exceptional circumstances will the Council grant consent to fell a tree protected by a Tree Preservation Order, and the tree will have to be replaced. Consent is also not normally granted for lopping, topping pr other works to protected trees unless essential to remove a hazard or ensure a tree's health.
10.13.3 ln new developments the planting of new trees is encouraged and developers are expected to agree and fund an appropriate tree and woodland management scheme with the Council. Proposals that result in loss or damage to ancient woodland or are detrimental to trees in terms of ground compaction, root disturbance and loss of water will not be approved.
 
 
NE11 In considering applications for development affecting trees or hedges the Council:
  1. May require a survey of the site and the trees and hedges concerned;
  2. Will oppose the loss of trees and hedgerows of amenity value and wildlife importance;
  3. Will serve Tree Preservation Orders to protect trees with public amenity value;
  4. May impose conditions on planning permissions to ensure the retention or replacement of trees and hedgerows of amenity value or wildlife importance, and their protection during construction.
 
10.14 Landscaping
   
10.14.1 In new development existing landscape features and wildlife habitats set out in Policy NE18 should contribute to the amenity of the area and wherever possible be incorporated within the design of the development.
 
 
NE12 Major development proposals shall be accompanied by a details of landscape features and wildlife habitats. Planning applications must include a landscaping scheme that indicates:
  1. Measures to protect landscape features and wildlife habitats;
  2. Measures to enhance landscape features and habitats;
  3. Measures to mitigate against potentially adverse effects;
  4. Measures to compensate where damage is unavoidable;
  5. Measures for monitoring and a management scheme including funding to ensure the landscape is successfully established and maintained;
  6. New landscape proposals;
  7. Measures that address personal safety in the proposed landscape.
  Where the site is divided into a number of plots, a structural landscaping scheme for the whole site must be submitted and agreed prior to any work commencing on site.
 
10.15 Water Environment
   
10.15.1 The water environment includes the District’s rivers, streams, ponds, navigation, surface water and any underground reserves. They are important as natural habitats and for biodiversity, recreational amenity, local landscape quality, and as part of the town’s surface water drainage system. Countryside management initiatives that enhance biodiversity, improve access or provide for informal outdoor recreation within Harlow will be supported.
 
 
NE13 In considering applications for new development affecting the quality of the water environment the Council:
  1. Will oppose any adverse effect on watercourses and their corridors, or on groundwater quality or levels;
  2. Will require the protection, maintenance and where possible enhancement of the River Stort, ponds, watercourses and field meadows;
  3. May require the reinstatement and management of ponds;
  4. May require the creation of new water areas, and the inclusion of schemes to enhance biodiversity;
  5. All management schemes, including funding, must be agreed with the Council.
 
10.16 Landscape Conservation
   
10.16.1 The Adopted Local Plan (1995) contains three Special Landscape Areas, that possess a special visual quality that distinguishes them from other tracts of countryside. These are the North East of Harlow (The Hatfields); the area to the North West of the town; and, the South West corner of Harlow (Epping Ridges).
10.16.2 The County Council designated these some 15 years ago, and their boundaries are defined in the Adopted 1995 Local Plan. The Structure Plan has replaced them with a “landscape character assessment” approach. Currently the County Council is assessing the character of different areas of the countryside for the Districts. Development will not be allowed that detracts from the visual quality of these areas.
10.16.3 Until these assessments have been carried out it is proposed that Special Landscape Areas will continue to be areas where conservation or restoration of existing character should be given high priority. Any change in name, status or extent of the Special Landscape Areas arising from the County Council’s landscape character assessment study will be reflected in a future review of the Plan.
 
 
NE14 Planning permission will not be granted for proposals that detract from the visual quality of Special Landscape Areas.
 
10.17 Biodiversity and Nature Conservation
   
10.17.1 The loss of the World’s Biodiversity, which is about all living things, both plants and animals and their habitats, has been of increasing concern over the last decade. The Government has called for Biodiversity to be a key feature of Community Strategies and a key test of sustainable development.
10.17.2 The UK Biodiversity Action Plan (UK BAP) is the UK's initiative to maintain and enhance biodiversity. At a local level the County Council, Districts and other relevant agencies and bodies in Essex have produced ‘The Essex Biodiversity Action Plan' (EBAP). This looks at the species and habitats of the County and details how they can be protected, sustained and increased. To assist biodiversity, the Council will encourage developers to set aside some 10% of major development sites in order to provide for an increase in wildlife habitats. Management schemes proposed by developers for these areas will need to be agreed with the Council before planning permission is granted.
10.17.3 PPG9 states that nature conservation should be taken into account in all planning activities which affect rural land use, and in urban areas where there is wildlife of local importance.
 
 
NE15 Planning permission will not be granted for development that would harm habitats or other features of the landscape identified as priorities in the UK, or the Local Biodiversity Action Plan, or are of significant importance for wildlife, unless it can be demonstrated that the reason for the proposal outweighs the need to protect the habitat or feature.
  lf granted, planning permission may be subject to conditions, obligations or management agreements for the provision of appropriate mitigation and/or compensatory measures.
 
10.18 Wildlife Sites
   
10.18.1 PPG9 also advises that local authorities should identify relevant international, national and local areas of nature conservation interest and emphasises the importance of both designated and undesignated areas for nature conservation.
10.18.2 There are three categories of wildlife site in Harlow, Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI’s), Local Nature Reserves (LNR) and Wildlife Sites. A number of wildlife verges have also been identified. A supporting technical paper contains a description and comment for each site. The local authority has a duty to manage SSSIs in its ownership. There is scope for community involvement in the management of wildlife sites.
 
 
NE16 Proposals for development within or likely to affect Sites of Special Scientific Interest will be subject to special scrutiny
  Planning permission will not be granted for development that would have an adverse effect, either directly or indirectly, on an SSSl unless it can be demonstrated that the reason for the proposal clearly outweighs the nature conservation value of the site itself and the national policy to safeguard the national network of such sites.
  If granted, planning permission may be subject to conditions, obligations or management agreements for the protection of the site's nature conservation interests and the provision of appropriate mitigation and/or compensatory measures.
  All management schemes, including funding, must be agreed with the Council.
  The following SSSIs have been identified on the Proposals Map:
 
Ref.No. Sites
NE16/1
Harlow Woods (including Hospital, Risden and Parndon Woods)
NE16/2 Hunsdon Mead
   
10.18.3 Three Local Nature Reserves (LNR) have been proposed, and these aim to conserve habitats of local significance and to enable public enjoyment of wildlife. The Council will encourage the appropriate management of these sites for their wildlife value.
 
 
NE17 Planning permission will not be granted for development that would have an adverse effect, either directly or indirectly, on the ecology of a Local Nature Reserve unless it can be demonstrated that the reason for the proposal outweighs the ecological value of the site.
  If granted, planning permission may be subject to conditions, obligations or management agreements for the protection of the site's ecological interests and the provision of appropriate mitigation and/or compensatory measures.
  All management schemes must be agreed with the Council.
  The following Local Nature Reserves have been identified on the Proposals Map:
 
Ref.No. Sites
NE17/1
Parndon Woods and Common
NE17/2 Stort Valley
NE17/3 Hawkenbury Meadow
  The sites will be protected from on and off-site development that is likely to have an adverse effect on the ecology of that site.
   
10.18.4 Sites of local ecological importance are designated as Natural Habitat (NH) sites in the Adopted Plan, and are protected from development. These sites and the LNR’s have been surveyed and reassessed, and the value of sites have changed. Some have been declared as Local Nature Reserves, while others have been deleted as they are no longer of the required ecological importance. Some site boundaries have changed and new sites are added. All the Natural Habitat sites have been renamed as Wildlife Sites (WS) to conform to the terminology of the Structure Plan. The Council will encourage the appropriate management of these sites for their wildlife value.
 
 
NE18 Planning permission will not be granted for development that would have an adverse effect, either directly or indirectly, on the ecology of a Wildlife Site unless it can be demonstrated that the reason for the proposal outweighs the ecological value of the site.
  If granted, planning permission may be subject to conditions, obligations or management agreements for the protection of the site's ecological interests and the provision of appropriate mitigation and/or compensatory measures.
  All management schemes must be agreed with the Council.
  The following Wildlife Sites have been identified on the Proposals Map:
 
Ref.No.
NAME, GRID REFERENCE
DESCRIPTION
NE18/1 Third Avenue, Elizabeth Way
Tl 428093
Road verges, neutral grassland and hawthorn scrub with flora
NE18/2 Kingsdon Lane Pond
TI 474092
Flora and fauna
NE18/3 Edinburgh Way Pond
TI 469121
Redundant pond, roadside bank
NE18/4 Marsh East of Wyldwood
TI 478129
Amphibia and emergent vegetation associated with wintering birds
NE18/5 Harlow Common
TI 480088
Neutral grassland and hedgerows
NE18/6 Clay Pit, Nr. The House
TI 483127
Pond and surrounding vegetation with breeding amphibia
NE18/7 Church End Pond
TI 434083
Emergent vegetation, submergent freshwater fauna and grassland bank
NE18/8 Third Avenue Meadow
TI 435095
Flora, hedges and stream; abundant insects and birds. ABTO. habitat site
NE18/9 Burnett Wood and Pond
TI 436075
Ancient woodland and pond
NE18/10 Latton Common including pond
TI 468079
Neutral grassland and pond; flora and fauna
NE18/11 Stewards Meadow
TI 445079
Relict part of old meadow with flora
NE18/12 Town Park Ditches
TI 454118
Wetland and lake, meadows drains and islands with diverse flora and fauna
NE18/13 Gravel Pit Spring
TI 463096
Ancient site of oak and hazel, many alien trees
NE18/14 Vicarage Wood
TI 458104
Ancient oak and hazel coppice
NE18/15 Harolds Grove
TI 424090
Ancient oak, ash, elm woodland of coppice with no standards. Good ground flora
NE18/16 Peldon Road
TI 454070
Neutral grassland, wet, meadows, hedgerows, streams, woodland, diverse flora and fauna
Ref.No.
NAME, GRID REFERENCE
DESCRIPTION
NE18/17 Pincey Book Meadows
TI 485128
Wet meadow, stream, hedgerows, good flora and fauna
NE18/18 Mead to West of Allende Ave.
TI 439113
Wet marshy grassland and flora, extremely important for wintering birds
NE18/19 Netteswell Rectory
TI 455096
Neutral grassland, pond, hedgerows, good flora
NE18/20 Third Avenue
TI 439089
Neutral grassland. Bramble and hawthorn scrub
NE18/21 Gilden Way Meadow
TI 479111
Pond with adjoining natural grassland and ancient hedgerows
NE18/22 New Pond Spring
TI 477106
Freshwater stream, lined with oak and ash
NE18/23 Brenthall & Barnsley Wood. Perry Spring & Reservoir
TI 478099
Diverse habitats, ancient woodlands, with oak, ash, hornbeam and hazel, rare species of flora on reservoir banks
NE18/24 Feltimores Meadow
TI 459110
Natural grassland semi-improved with oak, also spring and pond
NE18/25 Markhall Wood
TI 467102
Woodland with oak, field maple, ash and hornbeam
NE18/26 Netteswell Plantation
TI 449095
Diverse woodland with oak, hornbeam sycamore, scots pine, larch and redwood and varied ground flora
NE18/27 Eastwick Mead
TI 426113
Alluvial grassland, semi improved, of importance to wintering wetland birds, traversed by a diverse hedgerow
NE18/28 Gravelpit Spring, New Hall Farm
TI 473104
Woodland developed by natural succession on an old gravel pit
NE18/29 The Moors. Long Ley
TI 450098
A long linear glade with wood/scrub edges, neutral grassland and stream
NE18/30 Former 3m Research Ltd, Coldharbour Road
TI 429093
Bee orchid colony
NE18/31 Fountains Farm Pond, Tye Green
TI 456085
Pond with emergent and submerged flora and good fauna
NE18/32 Maunds Wood, Paringdon Road
TI 448076
Ancient woodland, oak hornbeam wood
NE18/33 Ram Gorse
TI 437108
Ancient woodland, oak hornbeam wood
NE18/34 Burnt Mill Lane
TI 447114
Ancient hedgerows with pollard willow trees
 
10.19 Protected Wildlife Verges
   
10.19.1 Harlow has a number of roadside verges which are valuable for wildlife. The verges require appropriate management to enhance their ecological value together with protection from any road works and engineering operations that could damage the ecology of the verges.
 
 

NE19

 

Planning permission will not be granted for development that would have an adverse effect, either directly or indirectly, on the ecology of a Protected Wildlife Verge unless it can be demonstrated that the reason for the proposal outweighs the ecological value of the verge.
  If granted, planning permission may be subject to conditions, obligations or management agreements for the protection of the site's ecological interests and the provision of appropriate mitigation and/or compensatory measures.
  All management schemes must be agreed with the Council.
  The following Wildlife Sites have been identified on the Proposals Map:
 
Ref.No.
NAME, GRID REFERENCE
DESCRIPTION
NE19/1 Second Avenue
TI 458095
Verge with diverse flora
NE19/2 Parndon Wood Road
TI 446072
Diverse flora and woodland
NE19/3 A414 adjoining Mark Hall School
TI 469111
Roadside Verge
NE19/4 Southern Way/Deer Park
TI 435080
Roadside in Green Wedge
NE19/5 Southern Way/ Parnall Road
TI 446082
Corner verge
NE19/6 Gilden Way Roundabout
TI 472112
Prominent roundabout at the entrance to Harlow
NE19/7 Chalk Lane
TI 495114
Roadside bank at top of M11 cutting
NE19/8 Well Lane
TI 431101
Ancient hedgerow
 
10.20 Protected and Rare Species
   
10.20.1 The presence of protected species and rare species is a material consideration when a local planning authority is considering a development proposal which if carried out would be likely to result in harm to the species or its habitat. Development which compromises the protection of European protected species e.g. bats, great crested newts and otters will normally require a license from DEFRA who need to be satisfied that there are no satisfactory alternatives and the action authorised will not be detrimental to the maintenance of the population of the species at a favourable conservation status in their natural range.
 
 
NE20 Applications for planning permission for new development that is likely to affect protected or other rare (UK and Essex BAP) specie(s) must be accompanied by a fully informed survey, carried out at an appropriate time of the year, detailing the development's impact on the protected or rare specie(s).
  Planning permission will not be granted for development or changes in land use which would have an adverse impact on species protected by Schedules 1, 5 or 8 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended), the Protection of Badgers Act 1992 (as amended), the Habitats Regulations 1994 (as amended) and other rare (UK and Essex BAP) specie(s) unless it can be demonstrated that the reason for the proposal outweighs the need to safeguard the specie(s).
  If granted, planning permissions may be subject to conditions, obligations or management agreements to:-
  1. Facilitate the survival of individual members of the species;
  2. Reduce disturbance to a minimum;
  3. Provide adequate alternative habitats to sustain at least the current levels of population;
  4. Provide a commuted sum towards securing the long-term management of the site.
  All management schemes must be agreed with the Council.
   
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